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Tiqqun Olam (Repairing the World)
Tiqqun Olam (Repairing the World)
Babylonian Talmud Tractate Gittin chapter 4
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The Babylonian Talmud is the Jewish composition of greatest scope, and its influence on Jewish life is decisive. Jewish sages have devoted more time and energy to its study and halakhic interpretation than to any other book, including the Bible, to the extent that "talmud Torah," Torah study, is mainly perceived as the study of the Babylonian Talmud. Its academic study, in contrast, is still in its initial stages. Critical editions, with the text based on the best manuscripts and an exhaustive and thorough critical commentary, have been published of only a few of the thirty-seven tractates of the Babylonian Talmud. Central questions pertaining to the manner of the formulation of the Talmud, its redaction, and its transmission are still unresolved. This is different from the state of research of other Rabbinic works, the study of which has taken significant strides in recent decades. Critical, balanced, and cautious interpretation of talmudic sugyot (discursive units) will likely illustrate the treasures to be revealed by a scholarly reading of the Babylonian Talmud: illuminating new facets of which traditional study is unaware; the consistent presentation of its meticulous literary fashioning, its contentual depth, and the creative force embodied in this corpus. All these find expression even in sugyot that seem tenuous and bothersome to the traditional student. Tiqqun Olam (Repairing the World) seeks to advance the research of the Babylonian Talmud with an annotated edition of the fourth chapter of Tractate Gittin, which contains various regulations that were enacted "for tiqqun olam." This chapter was chosen for the wide variety of its topics and the redactive methods employed, and for the benefit to be gained from their critical analysis. The widespread study of this chapter in high schools and yeshivot also influences its selection, in the hope it will aid both students and scholars in highlighting his difficulties and in exposing the overt and covert trends of the Amoraim and the redactors of the sugyot. The first chapter of this book examines the meanings of the term "tiqqun olam" in the Mishnah and the Tosefta, along with the structure of the tannaitic units containing regulations "for the repairing of the world" in these two tannaitic works. The main body of the book contains a systematic discussion of these mishnayot and sugyot, using philological-historical methodology, alongside the literary analysis, which has not been sufficiently developed in talmudic research to now. The talmudic text is divided into forty-nine sugyot. For each the book offers a new text based on MS. Firkovich 187, a list of parallels, a selection of textual variants and discussion of their originality, and a commentary. The commentary includes a detailed explanation of the sugyot and an analysis of their strata. A unique attempt is made to glean from within the traces of the difficulties within the sugyot and the dissonance they exhibit the aims of the redactors, who frequently formulated new laws, while devoting sophisticated literary effort in order to mask these innovations, and to impart to the sugyah a harmonious composition. In this book, much effort was invested to reveal the plain meaning of the Talmud, employing the tools of scholarly research - which, for various reasons, are not integrated into the widespread study of the Talmud today. The book undertakes to open a window to the academic world and its methodology, to enable Talmud students to come to know the world of Babylonian Talmud scholarship that is both demanding and profound, but also intriguing, while offering new insights.
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Women in the State of Israel
Women in the State of Israel
The Early Years
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According to its Declaration of Independence, the State of Israel "will ensure complete equality of social and political rights to all its inhabitants irrespective of religion, race or sex". However, the equality between men and women in Israel was not de facto. What did Israeli women have to say about that? The book presents views and opinions of Israeli women in the 1950s and the early 1960s about their roles and duties in the public and the domestic spheres, based on contemporary women's sections in the press and women's magazines. It shows what women said about women in the Israeli parliament (Knesset) and about Golda Meir; women's service in the Israeli Defense Force and the exclusion of women from the public sphere; motherhood and parenthood, woman's right to choose to have an abortion and women's struggle for peace; women's duties as housewives and the discrimination of women as employees. The book also uncovers a forgotten feminist journal, sheds light on a famous adoption story of a Yemenite baby and discusses a protest of female cadets in the Israeli Air Force flight course that was ignored and silenced for many years. The book unveils Israeli women's voices from the past, which show that in an era of many fateful decisions, Israeli women also made choices that affected their status in society. Readers might find these decisions relevant vis-à-vis women's status in Israeli society nowadays.
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MA'ARAG
MA'ARAG
The Israel Annual of Psychoanalysis
8
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MA'ARAG: The Israel Annual of Psychoanalysis is a democratic forum for psychoanalytic research, practice, and criticism published through the initiative and cooperation of the Sigmund Freud Center for Study and Research in Psychoanalysis of the Hebrew University, Israeli Association for Self Psychology and the Study of Subjectivity, Israel Society for Analytical Psychology, Israel Psychoanalytic Society, Israel Institute for Group Analysis, Tel-Aviv Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis, and the Israel Association for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy. This issue contains the following essays: Hila Elyakam and Devora Rosner-Wachs | THE ROLE OF THE BODY EN ROUTE TO BUILDING THE BIONIAN CONTAINER: INTEGRATING SOMATIC EXPERIENCE AND PSYCHODYNAMIC PYCHOTHERAPY Dana Amir | STUDIUM AND PUNCTUM IN PSYCHOANALYTIC WRITING Dana Amir | THE ‘NEWSPEAK’ OF THE PERPETRATOR: REFLECTIONS ON THE PHENOMENON OF SCREEN CONFESSIONS Dorit Ashur | FREUD AS “MIDWIFE TO THE SOUL”: THE RESTORATION OF MATERNAL SEMIOTIC PROFUSION IN H.D.’S ANALYSIS WITH FREUD Micha Weiss | ETHICAL PRESENCE IN THE PSYCHOANALYTIC ENCOUNTER: APOLOGY AS A POSSIBILITY Naomi Teller | TWO POEMS: TO CONTAIN DESIRE Moshe Landau | ON TRANSFORMATION FROM CHAOS AND BECOMING TO RHYTHM AND MENTALIZATION, AND THE RHYTHM IN THE TRANSFORMATION PROCESS FROM ‘O’ TO ‘K’ Rivka Matzner | PSYCHOANALYTIC CONSIDERATIONS ON THE MEETING POINT BETWEEN THE LURIANIC CONCEPT OF “LIGHTS AND VESSELS” AND BION’S CONCEPT OF “CONTAINER-CONTAINED” Ruth Netzer | ‘LISTEN TO HER’: POEMS ON THE ANALYST-PATIENT RELATIONSHIP Gila Ofer, Batya Shoshani and Michael Shoshani | WHEN ONE PLUS ONE EQUALS ONE: THE VICISSITUDES OF CHOSING BETWEEN TRUTH AND BLINDNESS IN THE OEDIPAL MYTH, AND THE FILM “INCENDIES” Gal Kachman | SILENT GRAVES AND TRANSIENT LIFE: ON SUBJECTIVITY AND MELANCHOLY IN THE WRITINGS OF ABRAHAM AND TOROK Victor Rubinov | THE CAPACITY FOR SUBJECTIVITY Merav Roth | TEARING UP THE LETTER AND THE URGE TO GET RID OF THE OBJECT Alejandra Sternschein | MY LANGUAGE, MY SPEECH, AND MY EXPRESSION: REFLECTIONS ON MULTIPLE LANGUAGES IN THE PSYCHIC SPACE OF THE ANALYTIC PROCESS Ofer Shinar Levanon | BETWEEN THE PSYCHOANALYTIC AND THE ARTISTIC ENCOUNTER: REFLECTIONS ON THE SHARED WORK OF THE COMPOSER YONI RECHTER AND THE POETS AVRAHAM HALFI, DAHLIA RAVIKOVITCH AND ELI MOHAR
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In spite of it all...
In spite of it all...
Aron Menczer and Jewish Youth Vienna-Theresienstadt (1938-1943)
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Translation:
Aron Menczer (1917-1943) was an active member of the Zionist youth movement Gordonya. After the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany in March 1938, he became deeply involved in the efforts of the Youth Aliyah to enable Jewish youngsters to emigrate from Austria to Palestine. Menczer postponed his own Aliyah in order to continue to work for the exit of Jewish youth from Nazi Austria, and became in September 1939 the director of the Youth Aliyah in Vienna. His absolute devotion to the emigration efforts and to the educational work with the remaining Jewish youngsters in Vienna made him their recognized leader. Menczer was deported to Ghetto Theresienstadt in September 1942, where he continued his educational work. In October 1943 he was transported to Birkenau with a group of 1196 children, who were brought to Theresienstadt from Bialistok, and with 52 adults who, like him, volunteered to take care of them. They were all murdered there. The personality and deeds of Aron Menczer are the center of the book. A couple of chapters deal with the historical background: the Nazi policy of pressuring Jews to exit the country, prior to the phase of deportation and murder, and the efforts by the Youth Aliyah and other organizations to rescue them. The book is based on the original German version edited by Joanna Nittenberg und Benjamin Kaufmann. Two new parts were added to the current Hebrew version, edited by Jacob (Kobi) Metzer . One is a comprehensive introduction which examines Menczer’s activity in light of some general issues raised in the research literature. The other part consists of archival sources which were added to the book for additional insights.
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The Modulated Scream
The Modulated Scream
Pain in Late Medieval Culture
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This book is an updated Hebrew translation of The Modulated Scream: Pain in Late Medieval Culture . Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. The subject of this book is human pain in the later middle ages (13 th - 15 th centuries) in Western Europe. The author surveys and analyzes the ways people wrote about pain in different situations (like the difference between childbirth and toothache), and the ways people described their own pains. In a world with very few pain-killers and nothing at all to make surgery bearable, people suffered much more pain than we do today. Consequently, since they could not banish pain, they sought meanings for it. Physicians claimed that one should not try to soothe pain, since pain was an indicator of disease and as such, it was useful. Lawyers and judges claimed that the infliction of pain by torture was a tried-and-true method for eliciting true confessions from criminal suspects. Experts in Christian theology debated the nature of Christ’s pain during his Crucifixion, and mystics tried to identify with it, even to feel it. The common people were exhorted by preachers to bear their illnesses with patience, since pain on earth saved them future sufferings in the afterworld. In conclusion, medieval attitudes towards pain were radically different from modern ones: while we try and conquer pain, seeing it as a challenge, people in the past, who were often in constant pain, gave reasons for suffering and adopted pain as part of their lives.
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Korot
Korot
The Israel Journal of the History of Medicine and Science
24
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In this issue we have articles, in Hebrew, by Professor Avi Ohry, on sanatoria in the Land of Israel, and by Reuven Gafni, on Russian-born Olga Feinberg who served the Arab and Jewish communities in Jericho during the British Mandate until forced to leave, with the destruction of her home, during the riots of 1936–1939. Dror Hubara looks at the example of providing quality medical care in a poor neighborhood in Israel, that of the old Yemenite settlement of Kfar Shiloaḥ close to the Mount of Olives, which came to an end in 1939. Moshe Pinchuk considers Hippocratic and Mesopotamian medicine in the texts of the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmuds. In her intriguing article Adaya Hadar looks at how the human pulse and its rhythms were understood by the early Hassidic masters, Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi and Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav, in different spiritual and metaphysical ways. Zipora Shehory-Rubin and Shifra Shvarts contribute an important addition to our understanding of school doctors from the Ottoman period till the end of the British Mandate. This saw the beginnings of provision of health services to students, pioneered by physicians like Dr. Hillel Yaffe (1864–1936) and Dr. Mordechai Brachyahu (1882–1959), first hygienist physician in Israel. In the English section Samuel Kottek also looks at medicine in the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmuds, reviewing several texts on medicine and hygiene, while Edward Reichman features an unusual medical halachic case tried many times as a ritual murder and focusing, partly, on the religious practices of Jews regarding removing a fetus at the time of death, or soon after. Much has been written about Mordechai Gumpel (Gumpertz) Schnaber Leviso(h)n and his role in the early Haskalah movement but Kenneth Collins’ paper concentrates on the years he spent in London and the links he established there with Christian Hebraists and freemasons, as well as on his medical studies with the famed Hunter brothers and his London medical practice and writings. His short Historical Note examines the question whether the early enlightenment rabbi, Baruch Schick of Shklov, was in London in the early 1770s during the time of Levisohn’s period there. Ephraim Nissan looks at the life and death of the Polish-Jewish neurologist Maksymilian Rose (1883–1937), considering the causes of his sudden death in prewar Vilna, which still has significance some eighty years later. Prof. Avi Ohry offers an important account of the career of Berthe Neoussikine (Batia Nose-Chen), a largely forgotten figure from rehabilitation medicine and electro-physiology in France and Israel. Korot has been carrying articles from the regular workshops and conferences on Medicine and the Shoah organized by Boaz Cohen, Miriam Offer and Shmuel Reis and, following the international event held in Akko last year, we plan to publish several papers on this topic in our next issue.
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Massorot
Massorot
XVIII
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We are pleased to present the readers with volume 18 of Massorot, published through the cooperation of the Center for Jewish Languages and Literatures and the Jewish Oral Traditions Research Center of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The present volume contains nine articles and a review (with additional notes) of an unpublished Hebrew–Yiddish dictionary. The contributions include work by established authorities in the field of Jewish language research, as well as the fruit of younger researchers who have recently joined their ranks. The diversity of the scholarship in the present volume is to be seen in the wide variety of languages discussed, the varied linguistic and literary topics analyzed, as well as the diverse periods in which the sources studied were produced. In his article, Moshe Bar-Asher analyzes the Romance component in the varieties of Judeo-Arabic spoken in recent generations in Ksar Es-Souk, Morocco. Chava Turniansky focuses on the Hebrew component in literary Yiddish as an indicator of the level of traditional education of the writers incorporating it in works they composed in the second decade of the 18th century. Michal Held examines reflections of spoken Judeo-Spanish woven into the weave of a contemporary Hebrew novel. Ilil Baum analyzes the use of the productive suffix -ad̠a in Judeo-Spanish as compared with the use of its cognates in non-Jewish languages of Ibero-Romance stock. Hanoch Gamliel argues in his article that some of the lĕ‘azim (or Old Judeo-French explanatory elements) adduced in Rashi’s commentary on the Torah should be understood as examples of grammatical categories rather than as lexical correspondents. Two of the articles in the present volume deal with problems of translation. Michael Ryzhik examines how the Hebrew names of birds and fowl appearing in Leviticus 11 and Deuteronomy 14 were rendered in Judeo-Italian Bible translations from the 15th and 16th centuries. Shay Matsa focuses on the linguistic characteristics of a modern Arabic translation of the Passover Haggadah produced in 2003 by a Jew from Syria, examined in the light of personal observations made to the author by the translator himself. Ora (Rodrigue) Schwarzwald compares the linguistic features of two texts in Ladino composed by the same author, Rabbi Meir Benveniste of mid-16th-century Salonika. Efraim Hazan presents and analyzes a letter of friendship in Hebrew verse from Morocco; the numerical value of the Hebrew letters of each stanza (except one) is 654, corresponding to the Hebrew year ([5]654 = 1894) in which the letter was written. The closing article focuses on an unpublished Hebrew–Yiddish dictionary written by Meir Berger in the 1970s. This article includes an introduction by Berger’s former student, Chava Turniansky, and personal notes by his son, Yitzhaq Berger. These are followed by Yitskhok Niborski’s review of Berger’s dictionary, in which it is compared with the 1960 Hebrew–Yiddish dictionary of Mordechai Tsanin. Niborski’s review was translated from Yiddish into Hebrew by Moshe Taube. The book features article summaries in English.
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HINNEH: Biblical Hebrew the Practical Way
HINNEH: Biblical Hebrew the Practical Way
Volume I + II + Tool Box
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Hinneh – a new and revised 3-volume edition A Biblical Hebrew Textbook unlike Any Other Introduction Hinneh balances two major demands of an introductory language program: the presentation of the most frequently occurring lexical and grammatical examples, and the sequencing of the material in a way that allows for easier teaching and learning. · Enables a rigorous yet non-intimidating learning experience for students of different levels. · Provides the skills and tools necessary to allow students to independently access most biblical texts early on. · Gradually builds students’ knowledge through wide exposure to a large number of biblical verses, prose, and poetry, accompanied by translation exercises. · Offers many styles and different possible interpretations of various biblical texts so that students can independently and critically examine and evaluate biblical translations. · Employs learning methods informed by second language pedagogy and related fields (e.g. order of presentation determined by both frequency and “learnability,” “Color by root groups” to internalize the complex verb system, etc.). · A textbook and workbook for both the academic and non-academic classroom, as well as for the independent learner. Rahel Halabe is a designer, developer, and instructor of both Biblical and Modern Hebrew curricula with more than 20 years of experience. For more information on Hinneh: Biblical Hebrew, The Practical Way please visit http://hebrew-with-halabe.com . To contact Halabe email rahel@hebrew-with-halabe.com . Chinese description of Hinneh Articles by Rahel Halabe Halabe on Hinneh as a reference book for Hebrew teachers
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Studies in Jewish Education
Studies in Jewish Education
The Hebrew Language in the Era of Globalization
12
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The collection of articles in 'The Hebrew Language in the Era of Globalization' is designed for researchers and teachers of Hebrew in Educational frameworks, and allows for a comprehensive study of varied aspects of the Hebrew language. The volume brings to center stage research issues regarding Hebrew in its cultural, social, and linguistic contexts; discusses the state of Hebrew in Israel and in the world; and looks into current curricula for the teaching of Hebrew as a Second Language. The volume is unique in that it combines theory and practice; deals with Hebrew as a first, second, and heritage language; and relates to learners of different ages and from a number of different populations – native speakers of Hebrew, the Arab sector in Israel, and Jewish communities in the Diaspora. The volume is comprised of three sections. The first section covers the following topics: The state of Hebrew in the context of Israel-Diaspora relations; Hebrew in European and American universities; the dilemma of the language of prayer; challenges confronting the modern reader of a classical text; linguistic and socio-linguistic trends in modern Hebrew; achievements of new immigrant students in academic Hebrew; the theoretical basis for the development of curricula for the teaching of Hebrew as a first and second language; and a model for a language policy in a multilingual and multi-cultural society such as Israel. The second section presents the new curriculum for learners of Hebrew in the Arab sector as well as curricula for the teaching of Hebrew in the Diaspora for kindergarten children, elementary school students and junior-high and high school students. The third section expresses concern about the future of Hebrew both in Israel and in the Diaspora in the era of globalization.
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Maarag
Maarag
4
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MA‘ARAG: The Israel Annual of Psychoanalysis is a democratic forum for psychoanalytic research, practice, and criticism published through the initiative and cooperation of the Sigmund Freud Center for the Study of Psychoanalysis of the Hebrew University and the Israeli Association for Self Psychology and the Study of Subjectivity, the Israel Society for Analytical Psychology, the Israel Psychoanalytic Society, the Israel Institute for Group Analysis, the Israel Institute of Jungian Psychology, and the Tel-Aviv Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis. The articles in this Volume: Efrat Even-Tzur - MORAL ACTION BY WAY OF FREE WILL FROM A PSYCHOANALYTIC VIEWPOINT: A LACANIAN READING OF FREUD AND KANT Dudi (Yehudah) Alon - “IDENTIFICATION” AND “CANNIBALISM” IN FREUD’S THOUGHT: CONCEPTS THAT ILLUSTRATE DELEUZE’S AND GUATTARI’S NOTION OF RHIZOMATIC THINKING Rivah Altman - “WHO IS COMING AFTER ME?” TWO MODES OF SIBLING TRANSFERENCE IN PSYCHOANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY Rony Alfandary - DREAMING IN ALEXANDRIA: A PSYCHOANALYTICAL STUDY OF LAWRENCE DURRELL’S THE ALEXANDRIA QUARTET Ruth Gat-Dubrov - ‘WETTING’ IN A SEA OF TEARS: THE JOURNEY FROM SYMPTOM TO THE OTHER Ditza Hananel - THE RAPE COMPLEX AND THE FEMININE OEDIPUS COMPLEX Joseph Triest - SEXUALITY AND ITS UNIQUE ROLE IN CONSTITUTING THE PSYCHOANALYTIC SUBJECT IN TERMS OF BODY-EGO AND OBJECT-EGO Refael Yonatan Leus - THE PRE-TRAUMATIC ZIONIST DREAM: A FREUDIAN STUDY OF BIBLICAL ETYMOLOGICAL INTERPERTATIONS OF THE NAME ‘ZION’ Ruth Netzer - FROM THE “TOTEMIC FEAST” TO THE “PEACHES OF ETERNITY:” FOOD SYMBOLISM FROM THE KITCHEN OF THE SOUL FROM A JUNGIAN PERSPECTIVE Shani Samai - THE LINES PLAY THEMSELVES: READING ‘THE THREE-LEGGED CHICKEN’ BY Y. KENAZ IN THE LIGHT OF DELEUZE’S AND GUATTARI’S CONCEPT OF ‘BECOMING’ Inbal Raz Brakin - REGARDING THE NAME-OF-THE-FATHER, THE DISCOURSE OF DESIRE, AND DEBT: A LACANIAN INTERPRETATION OF THE BIBLICAL STORY OF MIRIAM THE PROPHETESS Michael Shoshani and Batya Shoshani - A TWISTED MOTHER-SON COALITION LEADING TO PERVERSE NARCISSISTIC SELF-CONFIGURATION
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Jewish Fundamentalism and the Temple Mount
Jewish Fundamentalism and the Temple Mount
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The Temple Mount is the most sacred site in Judaism and the third most sacred site of Islam in, after Mecca and Medina in Saudi Arabia. The sacred nature of the site has made it one of the main foci of tension and friction in the context of the Israeli-Arab conflict. Jewish fundamentalism and the Temple Mount is original and pioneering research on a number of radical and messianic movements in Israel that wish to, and at times, are making preparations to rebuild the Temple. The manuscript examines the theological roots and historical circumstances that have given rise to the movement of Temple Builders. It places the different movements within larger political, social and religious developments, offering the readers a context to understand the place of such groups within the larger Israeli, and global realities of our time. The research is described in the context of the fundamentalist phenomenon – a wave whose ramifications go far beyond the context of the Middle East. The research gives special attention to the connection between Jewish Temple Builders and Christian fundamentalist supporters and presents the theological exchanges that have taken place. The Book points to the Six Day War as a watershed event that has given rise to messianic interpretations of the Israeli victory and its significance for Jewish history. Israel’s’ overtaking of Jerusalem, including the Temple Mount, resurrected and enhanced messianic convictions of Zionist Orthodoxy. However, the crystallizing during the 1980s-2000s of contemporary Messianic groups and their Temple oriented Messianic beliefs has driven not the euphoria of victory, but form the fear of disappointment. Those aspiring to build the Temple are afraid of an imminent loss of the territorial gains of made in the Six Day War, due to the peace process, and the theological implications of such setback to their messianic hopes.
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Sifre on Numbers: An Annotated Edition
Sifre on Numbers: An Annotated Edition
Volume 4
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Sifre is a Tannaitic midrash on the book of Numbers, and is rightfully considered to be one of the fundamental assets of our ancient literature. Its previous edition was published about hundred years ago by R. Hayyim Shaul Horovitz. Since then, additional manuscripts have been discovered of Sifre, its first commentators, and medieval collections and midrashim that cite it. This was accompanied by the significant development of the methodological conceptions of the study of the Rabbinic literature, and of the ways to publish critical editions of this literature. All these factors justify the publication of a new scientific edition of this midrash . The text of the new edition, that is based on MS. Vatican 32, includes many versions that differ from the earlier version, and that occasionally shed new light on the exegeses and halakhot of the Sifre. It is accompanied by the scholarly apparatus that lists and explains all of the edition's changes from the version of MS. Vatican. The number of direct and indirect textual witnesses presented in the "Textual Variants" section of the new edition is twice, and at times even triple, the number of textual witnesses that were available to Horowitz. In the detailed commentary on the expositions in Sifre, I made considerable use of all the Sifre commentators who preceded me, and who made a decisive contribution to the literal explanation of the midrash's exegeses and the clarification of their meaning. Thanks, however, to the diverse textual witnesses available to me and the great progress made in recent generations in the study of the language and teachings of the Tannaim, I believe that I have succeeded in recreating the original version of many expositions, in giving them a new and straightforward explanation, and in advancing the research of their redaction . The edition is intended, first and foremost, for the scholars, in Israel and throughout the world, who are engaged in the research of all aspects of the Rabbinic literature. Additionally, the new edition will likely aid the community of Torah scholars who teach and study in yeshivot, and the educated public at large. The first half of the work, comprising the portions of Naso and Beha'alotekha, was published by Magnes Press in 2011. Contents Part I: The Edition Volume 1 Preface Symbols of the textual witnesses of Sifre on Numbers List of symbols in the edition Introduction Editing rules for the text and the accompanying scholarly apparatus Textual variants Parallels passages in Talmudic literature The commentary Edition of Sifre on Numbers, portions of Naso and Beha'alotekha (the base text, and below it: 1. Scholarly notes to the base text; 2. Talmudic parallels; 3. Textual variants) Volume 2 Preface Edition of Sifre on Numbers, portions of Shelach till Masei (the base text, and below it: 1. Scholarly notes to the base text; 2. Talmudic parallels; 3. Textual variants) Part II Commentary on Sifre , Piska‛ot 1-58 (portion of Naso ) Part III Commentary on Sifre , Piska‛ot 59-106 (portion of Beha'alotekha ) Part IV Commentary on Sifre , Piska‛ot 107-161 (portions of Shelach – Masei ) List of abbreviations of the primary sources and the scholarly literature Indices
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From Maimonides to Samuel ibn Tibbon
From Maimonides to Samuel ibn Tibbon
The Transformation of the Dalalat al Ha'irin into the Moreh ha-Nevukhim
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This book offers an account of a key event in Jewish intellectual history that is also an important chapter in the history of Western philosophy: the dissemination of Maimonides’ chief philosophical work, the Guide of the Perplexed, through Samuel ibn Tibbon at the beginning of the 13th century in Southern France. Whereas Maimonides interpreted Judaism as a philosophical religion, Ibn Tibbon turned this interpretation into the foundation of Jewish philosophy up to Spinoza, making it into a systematic justification for studying Greco-Arabic philosophy and science in a religious setting. If Maimonides’ work was the gate through which philosophy became an important component of Jewish culture, Ibn Tibbon built the hinge without which this gate would have remained shut. The book examines Ibn Tibbon’s relationship to Maimonides in all its facets: how he translated Maimonides’ work from Arabic into Hebrew, explained its technical terminology, and interpreted and taught its doctrines. Due attention is also paid to Ibn Tibbon’s comprehensive criticism of Maimonides. The book includes the edition of what may be called the first commentary on the Guide: about 100 glosses attributed to Ibn Tibbon that were discovered through examining 145 manuscripts of Ibn Tibbon’s Hebrew translation. The glosses illustrate the different aspects of Ibn Tibbon’s relationship to Maimonides and the complex transition of Maimonides’ work from one cultural context to another.
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Sifre on Numbers:An Annotated Edition
Sifre on Numbers:An Annotated Edition
Volumes 1, 2 and 3
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Sifre on Numbers: An Annotated Edition Abstract Menahem Kahana I concluded the Preface to my work, Prolegomena to a New Edition of the Sifre on Numbers , that was published in 1982, by writing: "It is my hope that just as I was privileged to finish this Prolegomena , so, too, may I, aided by Heaven, be privileged to publish the edition itself". During the years that have passed since writing those lines, despite my concentrating on other topics, I continued to search for textual witnesses of the Sifre that were concealed in libraries throughout the world, in the East and the West, and I continued my efforts to interpret its expositions and decipher its hidden treasures. Now, after having completed the preparations for the entire edition and the commentary for the first half of the work, comprising the portions of Naso and Beha'alotekha , I decided the time has come to publish them. Sifre is a Tannaitic midrash on the book of Numbers, and is rightfully considered to be one of the fundamental assets of our ancient literature. Its previous edition was published about ninety years ago by R. Hayyim Shaul Horovitz. Since then, additional manuscripts have been discovered of Sifre , its first commentators, and medieval collections and midrashim that cite it. This was accompanied by the significant development of the methodological conceptions of the study of the Rabbinic literature, and of the ways to publish critical editions of this literature. All these factors justify the publication of a new scientific edition of this midrash. The text of the new edition, that is based on MS. Vatican 32, includes many versions that differ from the earlier version, and that occasionally shed new light on the exegeses and halakhot of the Sifre . It is accompanied by the scholarly apparatus that lists and explains all of the edition's changes from the version of MS. Vatican. The number of direct and indirect textual witnesses presented in the "Textual Variants" section of the new edition is twice, and at times even triple, the number of textual witnesses that were available to Horowitz. In the detailed commentary on the expositions in Sifre , I made considerable use of all the Sifre commentators who preceded me, and who made a decisive contribution to the literal explanation of the midrash's exegeses and the clarification of their meaning. Thanks, however, to the diverse textual witnesses available to me and the great progress made in recent generations in the study of the language and teachings of the Tannaim, I believe that I have succeeded in recreating the original version of many expositions, in giving them a new and straightforward explanation, and in advancing the research of their redaction. The edition is intended, first and foremost, for the scholars, in Israel and throughout the world, who are engaged in the research of all aspects of the Rabbinic literature. Additionally, the new edition will likely aid the community of Torah scholars who teach and study in yeshivot, and the educated public at large. To view and purchase volume 4 please press here Contents Volume 1 Preface Symbols of the textual witnesses of Sifre on Numbers List of symbols in the edition Introduction Editing rules for the text and the accompanying scholarly apparatus Textual variants Parallels passages in Talmudic literature The commentary Edition of Sifre on Numbers, portions of Naso and Beha'alotekha (the base text, and below it: 1. Scholarly notes to the base text; 2. Talmudic parallels; 3. Textual variants) Separate supplement of the edition of Sifre , portions of Shelah - Masai (text and scholarly notes to the base text) Volume 2 Commentary on Sifre , portion of Naso Volume 3 Commentary on Sifre , portion of Beha'alotekha List of abbreviations of the primary sources and the scholarly literature אקדמות להוצאה חדשה של ספרי במדבר
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Judges and Lawyers in Eretz-Israel
Judges and Lawyers in Eretz-Israel
Between Constantinople and Jerusalem, 1900-1930
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JUDGES AND LAWYERS IN ERETZ-ISRAEL tells the story of the local Judicial System – Judges, Courts, Lawyers – in the last 18 years of the Ottoman rule (1900-1918) and the first 12 years of the British rule (1918-1930) in Eretz-Israel (Palestine). The book answers, amongst others, the following questions: • Why is the Israeli Judicial System built in its present structure? • Who was the first Jewish lawyer in Eretz-Israel (Palestine)? • Was the Ottoman Judicial System really so infested with corruption? What were the relations between David Ben-Gurion and Moshe Sharett (Shertok) when they were Law students in Constantinople before the First World War? • Who established the new Judicial System in Jerusalem after the British conquest of Eretz-Israel (Palestine) in 1918? • How were “Native” judges – Arabs and Jews – nominated for the first time in Eretz-Israel (Palestine)? • Who was the first President of the Supreme Court of Eretz-Israel (Palestine) and why he was forced to resign? • How did the Judicial System of Eretz-Israel (Palestine) fight for its independence? • Who was the Jewish judge that was dismissed from the Judiciary in 1930? • What is the connection of the Eretz-Israel (Palestine) Judicial System and the love-affair between an elderly millionairess from Philadelphia (U.S.A.) and a dashing farmer-politician from Zichron-Yaakov who was 25 years youngrer than her ? The book is based mainly on primary sources – letters, documents, protocols etc. - discovered by the author in public and private archives in Israel and England.
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Perspectives
Perspectives
Regards sur Marcel Ophuls
24
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Un véritable courant de vie parcourt ces pages que Perspectives consacre au cinéaste Marcel Ophuls. La vie, le vivant dominent. Il n’est pas étonnant qu’une des contributions de ce numéro s’intitule “Liberté, vitalité, spectacle” (Sophie Brunet). Dès lors, la division du volume s’est faite d’elle-même: 1-Un homme vivant; 2-Une oeuvre vivante. Au départ, le portrait d’un homme se dessine. Dans une “interview imaginaire.” On savoure son franc-parler, non que l’on adhère à toutes ses idées – en particulier en ce qui concerne Israël – mais on admire l’aisance et la liberté totale qui anime ses propos. Le comportement professionnel du cinéaste, son comportement tout court, trouvent leur place dans cette première partie. Parfois même, l’homme est saisi dans le feu de l’action. Les grands problèmes qui occupent le coeur et la pensée d’un homme de notre temps se retrouvent dans la seconde partie du volume. Là encore, au plus près de la vie . Le cinéaste interpelle les spectateurs lorsqu’il traite de la Shoah, de l’Occuption, ou de la Résistance, de la place que ces sujets tiennent dans la mémoire d’un Français ou d’un Allemand. On s’interroge avec le cinéaste : se doit-il d’être objectif? Mais “dès le début de sa carrière, remarque Pierre Beylot, un style documentaire original fondé sur la parole de témoignage et le montage des sources dont il assume de plus en plus ostensiblement le caractère subjectif” marque son oeuvre. C’est dire aussi que souvent le regard s’attarde sur le traitement esthétique des sujets abordés. Ecoutons François Niney:“Cette remise en question de nos manières de voir et de nos dilemmes, à la fois politiques et personnels, par le jeu et le poids des mots, différencie radicalement le documentaire selon Marcel, du panel d’opinions tel que l’expose en permanence l’étal médiatique”. L’important est que son public réfléchisse. Il s’agit, selon Valérie Carré, de “mettre en mouvement la réflexion du spectateur”. Qu’attendre de l’avenir? Encore une oeuvre surprenante? Vincent Lowy, à l’écoute, note: “Boulimique de projets virtuels, l’infatigable MO junior annonce déjà les quatre titres d’ […] improbables best-sellers…” [futurs romans policiers }. Il convient enfin de souligner le rôle déterminant qu’a joué Stéphane Kerber dans l’élaboration de ce numéro de Perspectives. Nos vifs remerciements vont à lui. Laissons-lui maintenant la parole.
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Italia
Italia
XX
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Periodical for research in the history, culture, and literature of the Jews of Italy. Whoever is dealing with Jewish thought and humanities knows well how important and influential the Italian Jews were and are in these wide ranges of fields. The large creation and thought of the Italian Jews was passed on for multi generations in Hebrew and Italian while keeping a firm methodical tradition which ITALIA periodical is following and keeping the importance of studying and researching the language, literature, culture and history of Italy and Italian Jews. Italian Jews had a strong presence in the European culture from the 13th century on to our current time. Documents, manuscripts and many books show us many remarkable authors and thinkers, Italian Jews and others, that had strong ties with the rather small ethnicity of Italian Jews. Even though there are many respected studies on the contributions of Italian Jews to the cultural making of the Italian nation, there is still a necessary need for a centralized publication of these past and new studies. ITALIA is an important focus point for an academic discussion on the culture, literature, history and language of Italian Jews as well as a place where we can weight the conclusions of these studies and place goals for future doing in these exciting full of aspects fields. Italia – Studi e Ricerche sulla cultura e sulla letteratura degli Ebrei d'Italia Studi e Ricerche Sulla Storia, la Cultura e la Letteratura Degli Ebrei d’Italia Dario Burgaretta Sicilia conservata a Messina Alessandro Guetta universale : forme del pensiero ebraico in Italia tra ‘500 e ‘700 ITALIA è la Rivista di letteratura e cultura, di filologia e linguistica, di storia e d 'arte sull' Ebraismo italiano, pubblicata dalla Casa Editrice Magnes, dell'Università ebraica di Gerusalemme. Agli esperti di studi ebraici post-biblici e di studi umanistici, filosofici e storici in genere accade di imbattarsi in una fitta rete di interessi scientifici in cui gli ebrei italiani compaiono, ora in modo preponderante ora marginalmente e di scorcio. La presenza costante dell' Ebraismo italiano nel panorama culturale europeo ha le sue origine lontano nel tempo. Ed è quasi una norma che manoscritti, editiones principes, libri antichi e moderni abbiano avuto e continuino ad avere attinenza, in maniera diretta o indiretta, col piccolo nucleo ebraico della penisola. La Rivista Italia vuole essere il luogo di incontro per studiosi ed esperti interessati a pubblicare ricerche originali che trattino ed esplorino le ancora molte 'terre incognite' dell'ebraismo italiano, in tutti i momenti della sua storia. Italia si propone di ampliare il suo raggio di influenza e il suo ruolo guida nella ricerca scientifica sull'Ebraismo italiano in Israele e nel mondo. La Rivista esce una volta all'anno con articoli in ebraico, italiano, inglese e francese. È possibile ordinare i numeri arretrati della Rivista Italia (20 volumi pubblicati) presso la Mangnes University Press di Gerusalemme.
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Rabbi in the New World
Rabbi in the New World
The Influence of Rabbi J. B. Soloveitchik on Culture, Education and Jewish Thought
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Rabbi J.B Soloveitchik (1903-1993) was the preeminent leader of Modern Orthodoxy in the United States for nearly 50 years. His prominence in American Orthodox life was based upon his expertise in Torah and Western intellectual culture, his extraordinary pedagogical and rhetorical skills and his halakhic authority. As the head of the World Mizrachi, he also played an influential role on religious Zionism in Israel. Rabbi in the New World , explores the extent of Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik’s leadership in shaping the Orthodox communities in the United States and analyzes the characteristics and multiple domains of his influence. The book examines the question of whether Rabbi Soloveitchik’s leadership is best understood as limited to American Orthodoxy or whether his influence exceeded those boundaries. The essays in the book probe which of his students most closely reflect his religious philosophy, whether his vision was sufficiently flexible to meet the challenges of the present and the future, and whether Rabbi Soloveitchik was open to inter-religious dialogue. The book contains twenty-six articles by scholars in history, sociology, education, theology and philosophy, all of whom evaluate Rabbi Soloveitchik’s works and the era in which he was active. Rabbi in the New World , was co-edited by Dr. Avinoam Rosenak, Chair of Jewish Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Research Fellow at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute and Rabbi Prof. Naftali Rothenberg, Senior Research Fellow at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute and Rabbi of Har Adar.
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The Twice Told Tale
The Twice Told Tale
A Poetics of the Exegetical Narrative in Rabbinic Midrash
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This book presents a descriptive and historical poetics of the re-written bible, or the exegetical narrative in rabbinic literature of Late Antiquity. The exegetical narrative is composed of a story which simultaneously represents and interprets its biblical counterpart. As a hermeneutical reading of the biblical story presented in narrative form, its defining characteristic lies precisely in this synergy of narrative and exegesis. This genre is but one historical manifestation of the general cultural phenomenon of re-writing canonical texts which begins already in the Bible itself and could be said to reach the modern era in works by Thomas Mann, Joseph Heller, and even “Moses the Prince of Egypt.” Paradoxically, it is precisely the canonical status of the text – that which acts as the foundation for its cultural legitimacy – that invites its constant transformation, violation, and appropriation by succeeding generations of readers. Within this general perspective, this book concentrates on one specific historical moment – rabbinic culture in Late Antiquity. Why, in what circumstances, and through which means does rabbinic culture transfigure itself by re-imagining its past? How does this genre exert its hegemony over the sacred text, its power and meanings? What are the cultural paradigms of coherence that both enable and restrain its reception? These are some of the questions the book addresses in an attempt to provide a new perspective on the cultural imagination of the rabbinic period.
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The Halakhah as an Event
The Halakhah as an Event
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The Halakha is not just a body of literature; it is also a cultural event. It follows then that the philosophy of Halakha must address the happening of the Halakha. Surprisingly, till now philosophers of Halakha have not addressed this dimension of the event or the happening of the Halakha. The articles in this book are an attempt at facing this challenge. But this is not simple because herein lies a paradox. If the event or the happening is something that lies outside the confines of what is captured in the written word, the effort to write about it is one that must take us on a fascinating journey between what is possible and what perhaps is not. What is the nature of the Halakha as an event? What is the knowledge contained in this dimension of the Halakha that defies conceptualization in the written word? How does the insight that the Halakha is principally an event dramatically affect the philosophy of the Halakha? As we have said, philosophers of the Halakha have not addressed this question before and the authors in this collection – scholars and researchers from a wide range of fields – are all facing it for the first time bringing to it a wide range of tools from fields as varied as philosophy, Jewish thought, performance, cinema, group dynamics, cognition, gender studies and more. Together they offer us a new discourse and framework for conceptualizing the philosophy of the Halakha.
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The Cairo Geniza Collection in Geneva
The Cairo Geniza Collection in Geneva
Catalogue and Studies
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Geniza Collection in Geneva Some 350 large vellum sheets, originating from the Cairo Geniza, were uncovered this May by Professor David Rosenthal of the Hebrew University at the Bibliothèque publique et universitaire in Geneva. The Cairo Geniza is an immense depository of Jewish texts, first discovered in the late nineteenth century by Professor Zalman Schechter in the synagogue of Fustat, Cairo. The Geneva collection had apparently been acquired in the same year by a Geneva university papyrologist, Professor Jules Nicole, supplementarily to papyri he had purchased. Following a preliminary examination of the material, it was apparent that the Geniza collection in Geneva included many new fragments of great interest, pertaining to various fields of Jewish studies. Bible : A copy of the Bible carries a dedicatory inscription on the front page of Genesis: “Dedicated to the Synagogue of the Jerusalemites, cursed be he who steals this, cursed be he who sells this, cursed be he who knowingly buys this.” The book was owned by the community of the synagogue of Fustat, which followed the tradition of Eretz Yisrael (i.e. Jerusalem). Indeed, there were also a number of fragments belonging to an assemblage of haftarot. These reflect the practice of a three-and-a-half-year Torah reading cycle in the tradition of Eretz Yisrael. A Masoratic text that was in this collection concludes with a message referring to the renowned masora authorities Ben Naphtali (9th-10th centuries) and adds a name to the geneological roster of this celebrated family. He provides the traditional vocalization and cantillation symbols but deals with counting the verses as well. Talmud : The Geneva collection includes fragments of Mishna, Talmud Bavli and Midrash, as well as two fragments of the Talmud Yerushalmi. The latter, preserved in only one medieval manuscript ) the Leiden Ms.), is therefore of particular interest: the fragment of Yerushalmi Bikkurim amends the traditional text, while the other is an abridged version of Yerushalmi Kiddushin . Halakha : A number of fragments of Geonic texts were found, including a copy of Halakhot Gedolot , Rav Sa’adya Ga’on’s Sefer Mizevot in Arabicand fragments of halakhot of Alfasi and Maimonides. Of special interest are two pages of previously unknown responsa of the geonim Rav Sherira and Rav Hai, addressed to the community of Egypt (10th century). Also found was a fragment of Sefer haGalui , a polemical treatise by Rav Sa’adya Ga’on against the Exilarch and against the head of the Babylonian academy. This text, previously preserved in Hebrew and in Arabic, was found in Geneva on two joined folios. It includes a new passage of the Hebrew version and a previously published (1891) passage of the Arabic version, but here the copiers had excised Rav Sa’adya’s pungent attacks against his adversaries. Liturgy and Prayer : Liturgical verses of HaQalir, previously known in corrupted versions, appear here. Completely new material was also discovered, such as an important liturgical poem from a rare book of piyyutim by Rav Sa'adya Gaon. A laudatory poem by Dunash ben Labrat (10th century) to Hisdai ibn Shaprut, as well as new liturgical poems, have now become available to us. Historical Documents : Found in the new collection are a bill of divorce written in Fustat in 1166, and four letters of correspondence written by and to the leaders of the community. These include a response ruling on financial matters, written in Arabic by R. Elhanan ben R. Hushiel (Qayrawan, first half of 11 th century), of whom only two letters were previously known. This find helps clarify a scholarly debate regarding the identification of this scholar with Rabenu Hananel Berabi Hushiel, the great commentator of the Talmud.
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The Latest Phase
The Latest Phase
Essays on Hasidism by Gershom Scholem
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Gershom Sholem (1897-1982), was one of the most renowned figures in Modern Jewish Culture of the 20th Century. He is one of the leading researchers of Judaism in general, and of Cabbala, Sevtaota, Mysticism and Jewish Torat haSod especially. Even now, a whole generation posthumously, his fountains of diverse creation have not ceased to flow. His personality and scientific contemplation change form and fill dozens of books and studies. Scholem dealt many times in Hasidism and its world, and the THE LATEST PHASE – called thus after the opening article of the collection – assembles all his papers on the subject for the first time. The range of Hasidism studies by Scholem is wide and diverse: from the Baal Shem Tov's spiritual world and historic figure, through the abolition of messianicism in the Hasidism and ending in his famous controversy with Martin Buber. Thought, History, Bibliography, newly and originally interpreted Historical documents, Piercing criticism of Authors and Books, Innovations and Insights – all these forged new ways of understanding Hasidism, accompany its research and have not lost their essence. All the papers have been reprinted and have had many remarks and annotations added to them, placing the original articles in the unique context in which they were written and enriching them bibliographically. The Editors of the book are Prof. David Assaf from the Department of History of the Jewish People in the Tel Aviv University and Dr. Esther Liebes director of the Gershom Scholem Library in the Jewish National and University Library in Jerusalem.
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On the Conciliation of Nature and Grace
On the Conciliation of Nature and Grace
A Latin Translation and Commentary on the Zohar by Guillaume Postel (1510-1581)
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Translation:
Ever since its emergence in the thirteenth-century , Jewish Kabbalah, and most prominently – the Book of Zohar, has captured the hearts of Jewish as well as non-Jewish readers. Significant interest in Kabbalah is evident in the Renaissance, when various Christian Scholars accepted the traditional Jewish narrative, according to which the corpus of medieval Jewish Kabbalah is the Oral Law given to Moses on Mount Sinai. The sixteenth century is rightfully considered the golden age of this kind of Christian interest in Jewish Kabbalah. During this period a group of scholars, high-rank priests, and secular rulers were familiar with Kabbalistic notions, some of these Christians read the Kabbalistic treatises, whether in their original versions or in translation, some even composed commentaries or translated them into Latin, and most important - they incorporated Kabbalistic notions into their own theological and messianic conceptions. Among Kabbalistic writings, most of these thinkers' attention was drawn to the Zohar, and some of them attempted to translate parts of it into Latin. The first comprehensive, though not complete Latin translation of the Zohar was composed by the French orientalist and mystic Guillaume Postel in the middle of the 16 th century. Postel was a prolific and original thinker, who developed an elaborate messianic theological schema, which he based upon Kabbalistic notions. Convinced, as he was, that the Zohar is the perfect and ultimate expression of his own messianic concepts, he embarked on his life project – producing a Latin translation and commentary on the Zohar. This fascinating c ommentary on the Zohar never appeared in print nor was it ever translated into any language. In Judith Weiss's On the Conciliation of Nature and Grace substantial parts of Postel's Commentaries on the Zohar are presented in the original Latin vis a vis her Hebrew translation, accompanied by introductions and notes, elucidating Postel's unique perception of the Zohar and the Kabbalah.
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Against Meidias
Against Meidias
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Meidias (in Greek Mειδίας; lived 4th century BC), an Athenian of considerable wealth and influence, was a violent and bitter enemy of Demosthenes, the orator. His hostility he first displayed in 361 BC when he broke violently into the house of Demosthenes, with his brother Thrasylochus, to take possession of it,–Thrasylochus having offered, in the case of a trierarchy, to make an exchange of property with Demosthenes, under a private understanding with the guardians of the latter that, if the exchange were effected, the suit then pending against them should be dropped. This led Demosthenes to bring against him an accusation of kakegoria (ie verbal insult), and when Meidias after his condemnation did not fulfil his obligations, Demosthenes brought against him a dike exules (ie a trial for obtaining something already lawfully assigned to the plaintif). Meidias found means to prevent any decision being given far a period of eight years, and at length, in 354 BC, he had an opportunity to take revenge upon Demosthenes, who had in that year voluntarily undertaken the choregia. Meidias not only endeavoured in all possible ways to prevent Demosthenes from dis­charging his office in its proper form; also, their mutual relations were sored more still when Demosthenes attempted to oppose the proposal for sending aid against Callias and Taurosthenes of Chalcis to Plutarch, the tyrant of Eretria, and the friend of Meidias. The breaking point arrived when Meidias attacked Demosthenes with open violence during the celebration of the great Dionysia. Such an act gave Demosthenes a good opportunity for moving a public incrimination against his enemy (353 BC), and on this occasion wrote Against Meidias, still extant, which was never pronounced as the two adversaries found an amicable arrangement under which Demosthenes retired his accusation for thirty minae.
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New beginnings
New beginnings
Holocaust Survivors in Bergen-Belsen and the British Zone in Germany, 1945-1950
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Bergen-Belsen, a symbol of Nazi satanic evil, was the biggest concentration camp in Germany and the only one to be transformed after the war to become a Displaced Persons' camp and an assembly and rehabilitatation center for many thousands survivors from Eastern Europe, who wished to leave Europe heading for America or Eretz Israel. During its five years' existence as DP camp, Bergen-Belsen became a focal point for the national organization of all the Jews in the British Occupation Zone in North-West Germany, including those who founded the new German-Jewish communities. How did the survivors manage to rehabilitate after the hell they had gone through and against the background of difficult camp conditions after liberation? what was it that motivated them and what shape did their forced yet temporary communal life take? How did they transform from dying people into a dynamic and active entity, with national aspirations? Who were those who founded the new communities side by side with the DO camps|? What was it that motivated them to settle down in Germany, the country of their persecutors and torturers? How did they relate to their DP brothers and what did they aspire to? "New Beginnings" present an unprecedented in-depth inquiry into the development of Jewish lives in postwar Germany. The story of the suevivors, told here from within and based on an extensive variety of primary sources, illuminates a key chapter in post Holocaust Jewish history.
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Two Together
Two Together
A New Religious-Secular Philosophy
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Two Together , by Moshe Meir, embodies a breakthrough in Judaic philosophy in the new era. Its roots are anchored in the sources of the Jewish religion’s twentieth century philosophy, particularly that of Hermann Cohen and Rabbi Soloveichik, and Chassidic philosophy and heritage; its background is the barren dispute between religiosity and secularism in the era defined as post-modern. Moshe Meir’s painful acknowledgment, drawn from personal experience, is that the independent identity of ‘the religious’ and ‘the secular’ participate in each other’s worlds, and the dispute not only divides them but causes splitting among themselves. In his book, the author develops a new religious-philosophical language which enables stepping out from behind the armor that prevents each party from seeing the other’s humanity, and creating not only humane Jewish rapprochement but also a personal identity that bridges and unifies the secular believer on one hand, and the believing secularist on the other. As a researcher of Judaic philosophy in the new era who has consolidated his own views on these issues, I was deeply impressed by the innovative impetus, clarity and intellectual integrity characteristic of Moshe Meir’s book, from the beauty of its structure, and its elegant style. It is an attractive book which, despite its depth, is eminently readable and enjoyable. This book will enrich and enhance the spiritual world of all readers interested in such topics, and may give rise to serious, in-depth debate among its enthused supporters and equally enthused opponents, whether they are religious or secular. (Prof. Eliezer Schweid, Department of Jewish Thought, Hebrew University, Jerusalem). The search for a refreshing religious philosophy is one of the most vital and fascinating of all. Moshe Meir presents a path which is both model and content for establishing one of the most unique modes of belief in our generation. Precisely because I do not agree with all his views, I consider it of supreme importance that his principles are read by, and echo within, every believing individual – either by their adoption, or critical review – as they convey a tone of orientation that is direct, and deep, in seeking God. (Rabbi Yuval Cherlow). In this beautiful, important, and innovative book, Moshe Meir creates the religious-secular individual from his image, similar only externally to the religious-orthodox individual. This intriguing creation caused me to reconsider my own likeness, and discover that after all is said and done, I am none other than a secular-orthodox person whose similarity to a secular-secularist is only external. (Ari Elon, author of עלמה די and בא אל הקדש (
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Africa and Israel
Africa and Israel
A Unique Case of Radical Changes in Israel's Foreign Relations
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The relationship between Israel and Africa is a unique case of radical changes that Israel did not experience in its relations with other continents. During the 1960's when most African states received their independence, Israel was one of the first countries to establish diplomatic relations with them and to offerthem assistance. Its representatives operated in 33 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Africa occupied an important place in Israel's foreign policy. The considerations that made Israel establish such a widespread presence in Africa were political, economic, humanitarian and security. Israel had expectations that through friendly relations with many African states, she could break through the circle of Arab enmity,strengthen her security and bolster her legitimacy. Hundreds of Israeli experts were dispatched to africa and tens of thousands of African students came to Israel. There followed, however, tremendous disappointment. In 1973, during the Yom Kippur war and after,almost all african states broke off diplomatic relations with Israel. The author elaborates on the main reasons for this collapse. In the 1980's Israel returns to Africa and at present it has diplomatic relations with 40 African countries. However, several changes have taken place in Israel's present policy towards Africa and they are discussed in the book. The author, who spent nearly 2 decades in Africa, has based his thesis on primary sources and also on his personal experiences
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Bearing Witness to the Witness
Bearing Witness to the Witness
Four Modes of Traumatic Testimony
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Bearing Witness to the Witness examines the different methods of testimony given by trauma victims and the ways in which these can enrich or undermine the ability of the reader to witness them. Years of listening to both direct and indirect testimonies on trauma have lead Dana Amir to identify four modes of witnessing trauma: The “metaphoric mode”, the “metonymic mode,” the “excessive mode”, and the “Muselmann mode.” The author thus demonstrates the importance of testimony in understanding the nature of trauma, and therefore how to respond to trauma more generally in a clinical psychoanalytic setting. In order to follow these four modes of interaction with the traumatic memory, the various chapters of the book present a close reading of three genres of traumatic witnessing: Literary accounts by Holocaust survivors, memoirs (situated between autobiographic recollection and fiction) and ‘raw’ testimonies given by Holocaust survivors. Since every traumatic testimonial narrative contains a combination of all four modes with various shifts between them, it is of crucial importance to identify the singular combination of modes that characterize each traumatic narrative, focusing on the specific areas within which a shift occurs from one mode to another. Such a focus is extremely important, as illustrated and analysed throughout this book, to the rehabilitation of the psychic metabolic system which conditions the digestion of traumatic materials, allowing a metaphoric working through of traumatic zones that were so far only accessible to repetition and evacuation.
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Maarag
Maarag
3
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MA‘ARAG : The Israel Annual of Psychoanalysis is a democratic forum for psychoanalytic research, practice, and criticism published through the initiative and cooperation of the Sigmund Freud Center for the Study of Psychoanalysis of the Hebrew University and the Israeli Association for Self Psychology and the Study of Subjectivity, the Israel Society for Analytical Psychology, the Israel Psychoanalytic Society, the Israel Institute for Group Analysis, the Israel Institute of Jungian Psychology, and the Tel-Aviv Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis. The articles in this volume: Aviel Oren and Gaby Shefler - AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION OF KLEINIAN THEORY: THE PARANOID-SCHIZOID AND DEPRESSIVE POSITIONS AND THE RELATION BETWEEN SPLITTING AND PSYCHIC DISTRESS Dana Amir - PERVERSION: FROM EMPTY EVENT TO EVENT WITHOUT A WITNESS Gideon Lev - DENIGRATION, INDIFFERENCE, FASCINATION: PSYCHOANALYTIC APPROACHES TO FAITH Ofir Levi - THE ROLE OF HOPE IN PSYCHODYNAMIC PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH CHRONIC AND COMPLICATED POST-TRAUMATIC REACTIONS Moshe Halevi Spero - A BRIEF NOTE REGARDING THE HEBREW TRANSLATION OF FREUD’S CONCEPT OF NACHTRÄGLICHKEIT Emanuel Amrami - THE ANALYTIC TRI-COLLAGE: COMBINING ALIEN THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES DURING CLINICAL WORK Beatriz Priel - PSYCHOANALYSIS AND TRANSLATION: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY ESSAY Guy Perel - FROM THE ‘WALL’ TO THE ‘MOJO’ WITH WINGED SANDALS: A JUNGIAN PERSPECTIVE ON LONG-DISTANCE RUNNING Michael Shoshani and Batya Shoshani - BORGES ALONGSIDE THE ANALYTIC COUCH: THE ANALYSIS OF A MAN WHO DWELLED OUTSIDE TIME Meir Chelouche - GRANDPARENTS AND THEIR GRANDCHILDREN: PSYCHOANALYTIC PERSPECTIVES Ofrit Shapira-Berman and Michal Waldman - A SONATA FOR TWO: PROFESSIONAL PERSPECTIVES AMONG PSYCHOTHERAPISTS WHO GREW UP IN CHILDREN’S HOSTELS ON THE KIBBUTZ
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Maarag
Maarag
5
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MA‘ARAG: The Israel Annual of Psychoanalysis is a democratic forum for psychoanalytic research, practice, and criticism published through the initiative and cooperation of the Sigmund Freud Center for the Study of Psychoanalysis of the Hebrew University and the Israeli Association for Self Psychology and the Study of Subjectivity, the Israel Society for Analytical Psychology, the Israel Psychoanalytic Society, the Israel Institute for Group Analysis, the Israel Institute of Jungian Psychology, and the Tel-Aviv Institute for Contemporary Psychoanalysis. The articles in this volume: A viel Oren - PLAY OF DREAMS, DREAMS ABOUT PLAY: ON DREAM SPACE IN PSYCHOANALYTIC PLAY THERAPY WITH CHILDREN Omri Bichovski - IS METAPHYSICS HYSTERIA? Gal Ventura - THE DEAD MOTHER, THE UNCANNY AND THE ANXIETY OF MODERNITY Ditza Hananel - REMARKS ON THE RELATION BETWEEN MOTHER AND SON IN THE EARLY STAGE OF THE OEDIPUS COMPLEX Shlomit Yadlin-Gadot - TRUTH AXES AND THE MULTILINGUAL MIND: THEORY AND TECHNIQUE IN THE MIRROR OF TRUTH Moshe Landau - THOUGHT, MEANING AND ANTI-MEANING: DEVELOPMENT OF THE AESTHETIC DIMENSION OF MIND Gabi (Gabriela) Mann - FLEXIBLE WALLS: THE ANALYTIC FRAME (‘SETTING’) AS THE CURATIVE CONTEXT Ruth Netzer - BEYOND ACTIVE GOODNESS: ON PSYCHOANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY AND JUDAISM Yorai Sella - THE SENSE OF SENSE: A REVISED PERSPECTIVE ON THE SCHIZOID DILEMMA IN LIGHT OF WINNICOTT’S CONCEPT OF THE TRUE SELF AND MERLEAU-PONTY’S PHENOMENOLOGY OF THE BODY Yochai Ataria - TRAUMA AS A BLACK HOLE IN THE HEART OF CULTURE: THE PASSAGE FROM INDIVIDUAL TO SOCIETY Roey Shopen - FROM THE PAGES OF A DIARY TO THE GAZE OF THE OTHER: AN ANALYSIS OF LEAH GOLDBERG’S DIARY AND DIARY WRITING AS AN ESSENTIAL PHENOMENON FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF SELF AUTONOMY
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The Golan – Land of Volcanoes
The Golan – Land of Volcanoes
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The Golan Heights is the only place in Israel where many big and small volcanoes exist. It features various volcanic phenomenons, some of which were created in a long process and some in just a few hours. Since the Golan is "young" (geologically speaking), these phenomena are well preserved, almost without erosion or later cover. Furthermore, volcano eruptions are often shown on TV, so we have a chance to understand them better than other geological activities that are slower or take place in the sea or far deserts. In order to understand and be impressed by the wonderful manifestations of nature that used to be stormy and wild but today is accessible and still, we need a whole book that will tell us about everything that unites all these phenomena together and also explain each of them separately. But it is impossible to understand the Golan Volcanic phenomena without first understanding the whole volcanic procedures on planet Earth, in the depth of the ground at the bottom of oceans and in faraway galaxies. Unfortunately many people who hike in the Golan pass by many beautiful and rare sites without a clue about what they are missing. Therefore this book's purpose is to inform them about the immense variety of these wonderful phenomena with minimum effort. This is the reason why the book includes two parts: a general chapter called "An introduction to Volcanology "' and another chapter called "Volcanism in the Golan Heights". In order to enable the readers to understand the geological terms in the book, it also includes a dictionary of geological volcanological terms called " A word in the stone ", a bibliography and a list of the prominent volcanological sites in the Golan: almost all of them are near the road so they can be visited and enjoyed without risking entrance to difficult trails or old mine fields.
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Shnaton - An Annual for Biblical & Ancient Near Eastern Studies
Shnaton - An Annual for Biblical & Ancient Near Eastern Studies
XXV
Edited by:
Contents: Nili Wazana – Preface In Memoriam Gershon Galil Prof. Zecharia Kallai 24.6.1923-17.1.2016 ) Amihai Mazar Prof Trude Dothan 12.10.1922-28.1.2016 ) Biblical Studies David Frankel - The Final Form of the Story of the Rape of Dinah in Light of Textual and Redaction Criticism Noam Mizrahi - From Wisdom to Hymn: The Literary, Textual and Linguistic Development of Jer 10:12-13 Miriam Sklarz - The Poet Before God, Against his Enemies and Facing his Congregation Naphtali S. Meshel - Dramatic Irony and double entendre in the Book of Job Amitai Baruchi - Unna Plural Forms Referring to ‘Elohim’ and the Israelite Cultic Proclamation Recurring in the Cult of the Calf The Bible in Relation to the Ancient Near East Shira J. Golani - ‘ That (No) Plague May Come Upon Them for Being Registered’ (Exod 30:12): Census and Plague in the Bible in Light of the Ancient Near East Mordechai Cogan - Restoring the Empire: Sargon II’s Campaign to the West in 720/19 BCE History of Exegesis David Kopeliovich - Hated by his Brothers: The Typological Function of Jeremiah the Prophet in Josephus’ Jewish War Jonathan Jacobs - Use of the ʻNarrative Parableʼ by Northern-France Disciples (11th-12th Centuries) Isaac Gottlieb and Stewart Vanning - Rupert of Deutz (c.1075-1129) and Jewish Commentaries on the Joseph Story Itamar Kislev - The Contribution of Minhat Yehuda for Improving the Text of Rashbam’s Torah Commentary Yohanan Kapah - Joseph Hayyun’s Maggid Mishne
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Micah
Micah
Mikra Le'yisrael
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The Book of Micah is composed of prophecies by Micah, a contemporary of Isaiah. Micah flourished ca. 733-712 BCE, or even a little later, but before the invasion of the mighty Assyrian army of Sennacherib to Judah. Not all the prophecies of Micah have been preserved, and not all the prophecies included in the Book of Micah had been penned, or delivered by Micah. In his detailed introduction and the commentary to the Book of Micah, the author deals with the complicated problems pertaining to the book, its literary units, and their oral and written history. The author of the commentary is Professor (emeritus) Yair Hoffman, from the department of Bible in Tel Aviv University, who authored also the commentary on the Book of Jeremiah (2001; 2 volumes), in the Mikra Leyisra’el series. He is the author and editor of numerous volumes and papers in Hebrew and English. He served as the head of the School of Jewish Studies of Tel Aviv University. Professor Hoffman’s commentary on the Book of Micah is a must for any Bible student. This commentary on the Book of Micah is part of Mikra Leyisra’el, an ongoing series of scientific Hebrew commentaries to the Bible composed by renowned scholars from universities in Israel and abroad. The commentaries are written according to the most recent achievements of biblical scholarship, and relevant studies in Semitic linguistics, Ancient Near Eastern studies, and archaeology, with special attention to the contribution of the medieval Jewish commentators and grammarians. The Mikra Leyisra’el series boasts the commentaries on the books of Deuteronomy (2 volumes); Joshua; Judges; Samuel (2 volumes); Isaiah 40-66 (2 volumes); Jeremiah (2 volumes); Ezekiel (2 volumes); Joel and Amos; Obadiah and Jonah; Nahum, Habakkuk and Zephaniah; Proverbs (2 volumes); Song of Songs; Ruth; and Esther. The commentary on Lamentations is now in its final production stage and the books of Kings (2 volumes); Ezra-Nehemiah; Haggai; Malachi; and Daniel are now in advanced stages of editing. More volumes are in various stages of preparation.
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The Parable of the Three Rings and the Idea of Religious Toleration in Premodern European Culture
The Parable of the Three Rings and the Idea of Religious Toleration in Premodern European Culture
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This study of the Parable of the Three Rings is the first full account in Hebrew of the history and the literary and allegorical origins of the parable, as well as of its reception from the early Middle Ages to the Early Modern period. The study provides evidence for the non-Western origins of the parable, which are known mostly through its Western European renderings in Lessing's Nathan the Wise and Boccaccio's Decameron. In some of its versions, the parable contains the idea of religious relativism. This idea was often accommodated in its particular cultural and religious surroundings, but at other times negated and altered to suit the preferences of the other narrators and audiences. Whether the original, relativist, possibly tolerant, message were upheld or not – makes the history of the parable more intriguing to modern readers. The study of the parable tracks the religious idea -- presented in various allegorical forms -- back to its Muslim origins. It also reveals the Eastern origins of the parable's literary framework. The discussion follows the evolution of the parable and its entrance into Catholic Europe, analyzing it contextually and with reference to prevalent contemporary religious ideas among Muslims, Jews, and Christians between the eighth and the sixteenth centuries . A Hebrew translation of Avishai Margalit's “The Ring: On Religious Pluralism” provides a logical-philosophical perspective on the idea of religious pluralism .
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Thinking Differently
Thinking Differently
The Friendly Introduction to Statistics
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If everyone who took a course in introductory statistics understood that there is a better chance of doing well and enjoying the subject than winning the jackpot, this book would not have been published and lotteries would be making less. Maybe you have a phobia regarding Statistics and maybe your conception of it is boredom, tedium and incomprehensibility. The book Thinking Differently invites you to reconsider. Statistics helps us understand phenomena in a wide variety of fields. This book presents in a friendly and humorous manner the logic, the intuition and the beauty of Statistics, without delving into mathematical depth. This goal of the book is not a mere transmission of technical details; it aims to impart comprehension and a way of thinking. The book places a strong emphasis on the connection between Statistics and the world, expressed by timely examples from many fields - via detailed applications, through exercises whose solutions appear at the end of the book and by means of pictures and illustrations. Basic statistical concepts, such as "average", are in everyday use. Why, then, is the attitude towards Statistics ambivalent? Why do we have faith in the weather forecast, but regard surveys suspiciously? What is a "statistical fraud"? How do babies come into the world? This book makes an effort to answer the first three questions and to underscore the intricacy of the subject, both its capability and incapability, the misunderstanding of which incurs errors and invites unrealistic expectations.
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Two Together
Two Together
A New Religious-Secular Philosophy
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Two Together , by Moshe Meir, embodies a breakthrough in Judaic philosophy in the new era. Its roots are anchored in the sources of the Jewish religion’s twentieth century philosophy, particularly that of Hermann Cohen and Rabbi Soloveichik, and Chassidic philosophy and heritage; its background is the barren dispute between religiosity and secularism in the era defined as post-modern. Moshe Meir’s painful acknowledgment, drawn from personal experience, is that the independent identity of ‘the religious’ and ‘the secular’ participate in each other’s worlds, and the dispute not only divides them but causes splitting among themselves. In his book, the author develops a new religious-philosophical language which enables stepping out from behind the armor that prevents each party from seeing the other’s humanity, and creating not only humane Jewish rapprochement but also a personal identity that bridges and unifies the secular believer on one hand, and the believing secularist on the other. As a researcher of Judaic philosophy in the new era who has consolidated his own views on these issues, I was deeply impressed by the innovative impetus, clarity and intellectual integrity characteristic of Moshe Meir’s book, from the beauty of its structure, and its elegant style. It is an attractive book which, despite its depth, is eminently readable and enjoyable. This book will enrich and enhance the spiritual world of all readers interested in such topics, and may give rise to serious, in-depth debate among its enthused supporters and equally enthused opponents, whether they are religious or secular. (Prof. Eliezer Schweid, Department of Jewish Thought, Hebrew University, Jerusalem). The search for a refreshing religious philosophy is one of the most vital and fascinating of all. Moshe Meir presents a path which is both model and content for establishing one of the most unique modes of belief in our generation. Precisely because I do not agree with all his views, I consider it of supreme importance that his principles are read by, and echo within, every believing individual – either by their adoption, or critical review – as they convey a tone of orientation that is direct, and deep, in seeking God. (Rabbi Yuval Cherlow). In this beautiful, important, and innovative book, Moshe Meir creates the religious-secular individual from his image, similar only externally to the religious-orthodox individual. This intriguing creation caused me to reconsider my own likeness, and discover that after all is said and done, I am none other than a secular-orthodox person whose similarity to a secular-secularist is only external. (Ari Elon, author of עלמה די and בא אל הקדש (
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British Pan-Arab Policy: 1915–1922
British Pan-Arab Policy: 1915–1922
A Critical Appraisal
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Translation:
In this myth-shattering study Isaiah Friedman provides a new perspective on events in the Middle East during World War I and its aftermath. He shows that British officials in Cairo mistakenly assumed that the Arabs would rebel against Turkey and welcome the British as deliverers. Sharif (later king) Hussein did rebel, but not for nationalistic motives as is generally presented in historiography. Early in the war he simultaneously negotiated with the British and the Turks but, after discovering that the Turks intended to assassinate him, finally sided with the British. There was no Arab Revolt in the Fertile Crescent. It was mainly the soldiers of Britain, the Commonwealth, and India that overthrew the Ottoman rule, not the Arabs. Both T.E. Lawrence ("Lawrence of Arabia") and Sir Mark Sykes hoped to revive the Arab nation and build a new Middle East. They courted disappointment: the Arabs resented the encroachment of European Powers and longed for the return of the Turks. Emir Feisal too became an exponent of Pan-Arabism and a proponent of the "United Syria" scheme. It was supported by the British Military Administration who wished thereby to eliminate the French from Syria. British officers were antagonistic to Zionism as well and were responsible for the anti-Jewish riots in Jerusalem in April 1920. During the twenties, unlike the Hussein family and their allies, the peasants (fellaheen), who constituted the majority of the Arab population in Palestine, were not inimical towards the Zionists. They maintained that "progress and prosperity lie in the path of brotherhood" between Arabs and Jews and regarded Jewish immigration and settlement to be beneficial to the country. Friedman argues that, if properly handled, the Arab-Zionist conflict was not inevitable. The responsibility lay in the hands of the British administration of Palestine. Isaiah Friedman is professor emeritus of history at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. He was elected Senior Fellow at St. Antony's College, Oxford and was a Visiting Fellow at the London School of Economics. He is the author of Palestine 1914-1918: British- Jewish-Arab Relations; Germany, Turkey and Zionism, 1897-1918; Palestine: a Twice Promised Land? Vol. 1: The British, the Arabs, and Zionism, 1915-1920, the editor of twelve volumes in the series Documents on the Rise of Israel; and co-editor of the new edition of Encyclopaedia Judaica, 22 vols. (2007).
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Rousseau: Progress as a Trap
Rousseau: Progress as a Trap
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Jean-Jacques Rousseau is described by many as a paradoxical philosopher. He often seems to be asserting both sides of a contradiction. His teaching has been a source of inspiration for various opposing and even antagonistic political movements and doctrines: He is considered to be one of the first thinkers of modern democracy, and an apostle of totalitarianism. He is the father of "Natural Education", but his thoughts might sound as a program for "Social Engineering" of human beings. He is a romantic, longing to simple life within nature, but again, he is a loyal son of the bourgeois civilization of his era. Rousseau's Paradoxical character is also reveled in his account of "Progress". It seems that he is saying to contradictionary things about this notion. On the one hand, it appears that, according to Rousseau, mankind can realize freedom only through a process of historical progress. On the other: that progress has enslaved men and brought disaster upon them. These paradoxes have deceived many of Rousseau's readers and interpreters, who chose to emphasize one side of Rousseau at the expanse of the opposite. The book "Rousseau: Progress as a trap" strive to avoid this mistake. It shows that the greatness of Rousseau's philosophy lies precisely in its dialectical character. Rousseau is indeed a Severe critic of progress, but his critique is not merely an "external" and purely-negative one: He is a philosopher of the enlightenment, and accepts the principles of enlightenment (in fact, he is one of the formulators of such principles). On behalf of these principles he criticizes enlightenment itself. Rousseau's decree, that progress has enslaved mankind, gets its critical substance only if one presumes, as did Rousseau, that progress should emancipate mankind. The philosophers of the enlightenment celebrated progress. In his optimistic epoch, and without denying the credo of enlightenment, Rousseau pointed out a dark and dangerous character of human progress. This book shows the Rousseau's dialectical, or ambivalent approach to progress anticipates important currents in 20th century philosophy and critical theory. Due to this approach, Rousseau's philosophy is perhaps more relevant today than it was during his lifetime.
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Rabbi in the New World
Rabbi in the New World
The Influence of Rabbi J. B. Soloveitchik on Culture, Education and Jewish Thought
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Rabbi J.B Soloveitchik (1903-1993) was the preeminent leader of Modern Orthodoxy in the United States for nearly 50 years. His prominence in American Orthodox life was based upon his expertise in Torah and Western intellectual culture, his extraordinary pedagogical and rhetorical skills and his halakhic authority. As the head of the World Mizrachi, he also played an influential role on religious Zionism in Israel. Rabbi in the New World , explores the extent of Rabbi Joseph Soloveitchik’s leadership in shaping the Orthodox communities in the United States and analyzes the characteristics and multiple domains of his influence. The book examines the question of whether Rabbi Soloveitchik’s leadership is best understood as limited to American Orthodoxy or whether his influence exceeded those boundaries. The essays in the book probe which of his students most closely reflect his religious philosophy, whether his vision was sufficiently flexible to meet the challenges of the present and the future, and whether Rabbi Soloveitchik was open to inter-religious dialogue. The book contains twenty-six articles by scholars in history, sociology, education, theology and philosophy, all of whom evaluate Rabbi Soloveitchik’s works and the era in which he was active. Rabbi in the New World , was co-edited by Dr. Avinoam Rosenak, Chair of Jewish Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Research Fellow at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute and Rabbi Prof. Naftali Rothenberg, Senior Research Fellow at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute and Rabbi of Har Adar.
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Africa and Israel
Africa and Israel
A Unique Case of Radical Changes in Israel's Foreign Relations
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The relationship between Israel and Africa is a unique case of radical changes that Israel did not experience in its relations with other continents. During the 1960's when most African states received their independence, Israel was one of the first countries to establish diplomatic relations with them and to offerthem assistance. Its representatives operated in 33 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. Africa occupied an important place in Israel's foreign policy. The considerations that made Israel establish such a widespread presence in Africa were political, economic, humanitarian and security. Israel had expectations that through friendly relations with many African states, she could break through the circle of Arab enmity,strengthen her security and bolster her legitimacy. Hundreds of Israeli experts were dispatched to africa and tens of thousands of African students came to Israel. There followed, however, tremendous disappointment. In 1973, during the Yom Kippur war and after,almost all african states broke off diplomatic relations with Israel. The author elaborates on the main reasons for this collapse. In the 1980's Israel returns to Africa and at present it has diplomatic relations with 40 African countries. However, several changes have taken place in Israel's present policy towards Africa and they are discussed in the book. The author, who spent nearly 2 decades in Africa, has based his thesis on primary sources and also on his personal experiences
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The Kethib and the Qeri System in the Biblical Text
The Kethib and the Qeri System in the Biblical Text
A Linguistic Analysis of the Various Traditions
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The Kethib and Qeri forms, scattered here and there throughout the Biblical Text, combine here, like a mosaic, to form a complete picture and give one a comprehensive system of language. The book analyzes this linguistic system according to the manuscript Kether Aram Tsova, presenting the method of the most authoritative Masorite scholar Rabbi Aharon Ben-Asher. This systematic study examines the Biblical phenomenon of Kethib and Qeri interchanges by linguistic criteria. The book consists of an introduction summarizing the research on this topic, followed by four chapters. Chapter One: Orthography dealing with different orthographic realizations of words as הנער (K ) / הַנַּעֲרָה Q))Deut.22:15) ). Chapter Two: Morphology engages in morphological interchanges, as ואתי (K ) / וְאַתְּ (Q ) (Jud.17:2). Chapter Three: Syntax including various categories related to the syntax in particular the morpho-syntax like syntactic concord, as מגדיל (ישועות) (K ) / מִגְדּוֹל (ישועות) (Q)( Sam.22:512). Chapter Four: Lexicon and style dealing with interchanges of K/Q in the domain of lexicon and style as העיר(התיכונה)(K ) / חָצֵר(התיכונה)(Q)(Kings. 20:42 ). Finally, a general summary of discussions and conclusions. Additionally, statistical data that indicate the validity of the findings with respect to occurrences of Kethib and Qeri in the Biblic Text in general. The Kethib and Qeri System in the Biblical Text is an innovative linguistic analysis, which will be of great interest to scholars of Biblical language, Bible Exegesis and Masoretic Text.
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The Last of the Lord`s Poets
The Last of the Lord`s Poets
Myth, Ethos and Mysticism in the Literary Works of Yosef Zvi Rimon
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The book The Last of the Lord's Poets deals with the beginning of Modern Religious Poetry in the land of Israel as it was reflected in the early work of Yosef Zvi Rimon (1889-1958), with the many turbulent upheavals the old and new Jewish settlement went through, as a background. Unlike other poetries, religious and semi-religious, which dealt many times in religious issues in-order to deal with personal or public issues, Rimon's Poetry focused on God, the search for him and the rebellion against him. Rimon's God was not a universal God, Deistic or the God of the supreme. Rimon dedicated his life and his literature, according to his own observation, to the God of Israel, the unique Historic Jewish people's God, with all of his cultural national symbols, according to his standing in the religious tradition. Rimon's poetry is based, similarly to all major religious poetry, on varied texts, many times from distant historical linguistic facets. Rimon used biblical texts, Talmud, Midrash, Medieval Jewish philosophy and poetry, Kabala, Hasidism and modern language and literature. The use of these texts is not external or random, but an educated use by a person who knew these literatures inside and out and dealt with them as if they were holly script. Therefore one should be patient while reading, and the rewards will follow. This kind of poetry requires time in-order to reveal, facet upon facet, the entirety of the meanings hidden within it. Reading Rimon's poems can be compared to time travel, in which the reader discovers hidden worlds, delt by lovingly and fearfully by whole generations until they were intertwined together by the poet in his poems.
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In the Talons of the Third Reich
In the Talons of the Third Reich
Willy Cohn's diary 1933-1941
By:
Edited by:
Translation:
The historian Willy Cohn kept a diary from his youth till his death in 1941. The book contains the entries written from 1933 till 1941, which had been hidden in Berlin by family members. This is a comprehensive document containing deep, serious descriptions. The diary was written from a subjective point of view, but also from the point of view of a professional historian. Cohn described the initial shock felt when the Nazis came into power, and the deep disappointment with the disappearance of the humanistic and democratic values he believed in which collapsed right in front of his eyes, as well as the move of many acquaintances to ‘the other side’. This reality created an ongoing conflict with the German patriotism which was part of his personality and became empowered even more during his military service in World War I . The diary includes much documentation of the Jewish community’s life: the efforts made and actions taken in dealing with the economic collapse which resulted from Nazi policy; the serious debate between the Orthodox and the Liberals, between Zionists and non-Zionists, regarding the objectives of the community youth's education; the cultural renaissance which took place within German-Jewish society in the first years of the Nazi regime, which Cohn was a part of by lecturing in his town and in many other communities on topics of Jewish history and Zionism. The stronghold which tightened around the Jewish community after the November 1938 pogrom (Kristallnacht), the isolation which was even more hurtful than the life-threatening economic hardship, the relationships between Jews and non-Jews during these times of crisis, the hope that the German people still has positive forces which will overcome evil, and the desperate efforts to leave Germany and immigrate to Israel – all these are expressed in a unique manner in the diary .
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On the Conciliation of Nature and Grace
On the Conciliation of Nature and Grace
A Latin Translation and Commentary on the Zohar by Guillaume Postel (1510-1581)
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Translation:
Ever since its emergence in the thirteenth-century , Jewish Kabbalah, and most prominently – the Book of Zohar, has captured the hearts of Jewish as well as non-Jewish readers. Significant interest in Kabbalah is evident in the Renaissance, when various Christian Scholars accepted the traditional Jewish narrative, according to which the corpus of medieval Jewish Kabbalah is the Oral Law given to Moses on Mount Sinai. The sixteenth century is rightfully considered the golden age of this kind of Christian interest in Jewish Kabbalah. During this period a group of scholars, high-rank priests, and secular rulers were familiar with Kabbalistic notions, some of these Christians read the Kabbalistic treatises, whether in their original versions or in translation, some even composed commentaries or translated them into Latin, and most important - they incorporated Kabbalistic notions into their own theological and messianic conceptions. Among Kabbalistic writings, most of these thinkers' attention was drawn to the Zohar, and some of them attempted to translate parts of it into Latin. The first comprehensive, though not complete Latin translation of the Zohar was composed by the French orientalist and mystic Guillaume Postel in the middle of the 16 th century. Postel was a prolific and original thinker, who developed an elaborate messianic theological schema, which he based upon Kabbalistic notions. Convinced, as he was, that the Zohar is the perfect and ultimate expression of his own messianic concepts, he embarked on his life project – producing a Latin translation and commentary on the Zohar. This fascinating c ommentary on the Zohar never appeared in print nor was it ever translated into any language. In Judith Weiss's On the Conciliation of Nature and Grace substantial parts of Postel's Commentaries on the Zohar are presented in the original Latin vis a vis her Hebrew translation, accompanied by introductions and notes, elucidating Postel's unique perception of the Zohar and the Kabbalah.
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The Parable of the Three Rings and the Idea of Religious Toleration in Premodern European Culture
The Parable of the Three Rings and the Idea of Religious Toleration in Premodern European Culture
By:
This study of the Parable of the Three Rings is the first full account in Hebrew of the history and the literary and allegorical origins of the parable, as well as of its reception from the early Middle Ages to the Early Modern period. The study provides evidence for the non-Western origins of the parable, which are known mostly through its Western European renderings in Lessing's Nathan the Wise and Boccaccio's Decameron. In some of its versions, the parable contains the idea of religious relativism. This idea was often accommodated in its particular cultural and religious surroundings, but at other times negated and altered to suit the preferences of the other narrators and audiences. Whether the original, relativist, possibly tolerant, message were upheld or not – makes the history of the parable more intriguing to modern readers. The study of the parable tracks the religious idea -- presented in various allegorical forms -- back to its Muslim origins. It also reveals the Eastern origins of the parable's literary framework. The discussion follows the evolution of the parable and its entrance into Catholic Europe, analyzing it contextually and with reference to prevalent contemporary religious ideas among Muslims, Jews, and Christians between the eighth and the sixteenth centuries . A Hebrew translation of Avishai Margalit's “The Ring: On Religious Pluralism” provides a logical-philosophical perspective on the idea of religious pluralism .
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Introductions to Sources and Traditions
Introductions to Sources and Traditions
Studies in the Formation of the Talmud
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The standard study of Talmud is to accept the given as ultimate, that the sayings and the interpretations recorded therein are faithful to what was actually said. After having checked for the genuine version, for the right GIRSAH, eliminating the scribal errors, the text assumes reliability and serves as a starting point for further discussions and additional deductions. For over forty years, Prof. David Halivni has questioned the given as the authoritative text and argued for the necessity to go back in time and reexamine the veracity of the interpretations. Many of the given interpretations are forced, do not neatly fit the text they interpret and often attribute to the authors of the statements intentions that they did not necessarily share. As a consequence, substitute interpretations were necessary to which the multi volumes of "Sources and Traditions" were dedicated. While the books dealt mainly with the actual Talmudic interpretations, the introductions dealt with the causes responsible for the deviations from the original. It took the writings of a few volumes to become clear that the interpretations, unlike the apodictic statements were not officially transmitted by the Transmitters, the professional reciters and reached the later compilers which are referred to in the volumes as STAMMAIM, anonymous scholars, only through random survival which was not always complete. Sometimes it survived in a truncated form which the later compilers filled in, conjecturing what was missing. The present volume contains all of the introductions which provide the reader not only with the final conclusion but also with the developmental stages which led to that conclusion further strengthening its plausibility.
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